What is ASO? Why does ASO rise?

By | 17 May 2021

ASO, the abbreviation for antistreptolysin O, is a type of laboratory test. It is performed to detect the presence of a certain toxin in the body, or in other words, the antibodies produced by the body against the toxin secreted by the bacterium called hemolytic streptococcus. The streptococcus bacteria, which cause discomfort in the body such as rheumatism, throat infection, skin diseases with rash, increase the ASO value approximately 1 to 3 weeks after entering the body. However, after the infection is completely cured, it takes 6 to 12 months to return to its normal value. Antistreptolysin O is used to determine if a person has had a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection. With the ASO test, it is not possible to precisely distinguish the presence of ongoing or recent hemolytic streptococcal infection in the person. However, in the presence of acute infection, the amount of hemolytic streptococcus per unit volume is 2 times higher than those in the recovery period. This difference between the presence of active infection and the amount of ASO during the recovery period is considered to be a significant finding. In the laboratory test, if the Antistreptolysin O level is above the reference range, or in other words, the high it is evidence of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection, the value may not increase by the same amount in all diseases caused by this bacterium. For example, in throat infections caused by hemolytic streptococcus bacteria, the ASO value increases to a clinical significance, while it may not increase at the same level in skin infections caused by the same bacteria. Therefore, to get a more accurate response with the Antistreptolysin O test, the test is repeated at least twice, several weeks apart. “Why does ASO rise?” Before answering the question, what is ASO?

What is ASO?

Antistreptolysin O, abbreviated as ASO, is a laboratory test to investigate the presence of a toxin called streptolysin secreted by hemolytic streptococcus bacteria. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus is transmitted from person to person by mixing mouth and throat secretions such as sneezing and cough into the air in small droplets. These droplets that remain suspended in the air for a long time contain hemolytic streptococcus bacteria and many symptoms occur in the other person. Sore throat, fever, stomach, and headache, swelling in the lymph nodes and tonsils in the neck, white inflammation foci in the tonsils are some of these symptoms. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection can lead to inflammatory pain in the throat, but in some cases, acute glomerulonephritis, acute joint rheumatism, pharyngotonsillitis, impetigo, and pyoderma gangrenosum. With the ASO test to determine whether the person has had group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection, it cannot be clearly understood whether the infection was previously passed or whether the infection is still active. However, the ASO in laboratory tests in acute infections is 2 times higher than the ASO value during the recovery period. Although this citation is a clinically important finding, not all group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus streptococci may have increased ASO at the same time. This condition can be seen sharply on the throat and skin of the streptococcal bacteria. Therefore, the ASO test should be repeated at least twice with an interval of a few weeks. “What does ASO mean?” or “What is ASO in blood?” questions can be answered in this way.

Apart from the toxin called streptolysin secreted by hemolytic streptococcus bacteria, the test can detect streptococcus bacteria after about 1 to 3 weeks when entering the body. The test for the person considered to have a different proposal should be done approximately 1 to 3 weeks after contact with the bacteria. In the laboratory test, the normal value of the Antistreptolysin O level or a different word ASO reference value in children is <150 IU / mL, possibly <200 IU / mL. In some episodes, the ASO site may rise approximately 1 to 3 weeks after contact with hemolytic streptococcus bacteria. After the infection is completely cured, it may take about 6 to 12 months for the ASO level to return to its normal value. The ASO value may not increase at the same time in every infection caused by hemolytic streptococcus bacteria. Therefore, the antistreptolysin O test can be repeated after a few weeks.

What is ASO?

In the test, if the ASO value is above the reference value, it is defined on the ASO rostrum. This form indicates that there is a group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection. When streptococcus bacteria enter the body, it rises after about 1 to 3 weeks and reaches its highest value after about 3 to 5 weeks. It may take about 6 to 12 months for the test to return to normal values. The test does not increase at the same level in every group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection. High antistreptolysin O level is observed in 80% to 85% of acute rheumatic cases caused by streptococcal bacteria, 50% in acute glomerulonephritis cases, and 30% to 40% in acute streptococcal pyoderma cases. A negative test does not completely exclude the presence of infection. Therefore, in suspicious cases and to be sure of the test result, the ASO test can be repeated at least 2 times with an interval of a few weeks. Different antibody tests can also be done to reduce false negativity. In the presence of some liver-related diseases, antistreptolysin O some increase may not be seen in the case of antibiotic treatment in the early period of the infection.

Why does ASO rise?

The bacterium called hemolytic streptococcus has a type of antigen called streptolysin O, or in other words, a toxic effect created by the entry of the bacteria into the body. ASO, whose full name is antistreptolysin O, is an antibody secreted by the body against the streptolysin O antigen. The ASO test performed in the laboratory is made by measuring the number of antibodies produced by the immune system. Therefore, the reason for the ASO elevation is the presence of hemolytic streptococcus bacteria present in metabolism. With the antistreptolysin O test, the presence of hemolytic streptococcus bacteria in the metabolism is detected approximately 1 to 3 weeks after the contact of the bacteria with the person. After the infection is treated, the ASO value continues to remain above the normal value for about 6 to 12 months. When group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection is not treated, it can lead to more serious diseases such as joint, kidney, and heart diseases.

What are the symptoms of ASO elevation?

Some of the symptoms seen in the case of antistreptolysin O level above the reference range in the laboratory test are listed below:

  • Weakness
  • Decreased appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Stomach ache
  • Swelling in lymph glands in the neck
  • Throat ache
  • Tonsillitis
  • Sore throat that increases when swallowing
  • High fever
  • Rash, redness, warmth, or swelling on the skin surface
  • Headache

Why is ASO height important?

Infection caused by hemolytic streptococcus bacteria can lead to many different health problems if left untreated. In addition to throat and skin infections, infections in the inner lining of the heart can cause permanent heart diseases such as heart rheumatism, inflammation of the kidneys, kidney failure, protein leakage in the urine, and high blood pressure. Therefore, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection must be treated.

What is low ASO?

A low ASO value as a result of the laboratory test indicates that the hemolytic streptococcus bacteria are not present in the person. Usually, ASO is defined as negative.

Do not neglect to go through health checks at regular intervals.

 

 

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